Salmon

Also known as:

Atlantic salmon, Pacific salmon, Chinook or king salmon, coho or silver salmon, sockeye, red or blueback salmon, pink or humpback salmon, chum or dog salmon.

Description:

Waters: Most species of wild salmon inhabit icy-cold North Pacific waters. Atlantic salmon is an endangered species, but markets worldwide are well stocked with the farm-raised variety harvested in the U.S. (Pacific Northwest and New England states), Chile, and Norway.

A long, thin, silver-skinned fish with a short forked tail. During spawning season the males of certain species (eg. sockeye) turn a bright red. The smallest weigh from 3 to 5 lbs., yet some are considerably larger-Chinook (or king) salmon can exceed 100 lbs.

The succulent meat of Atlantic salmon is usually pink-orange in color (there is also a white-fleshed variety) and high in fat, with a rich, pronounced flavor. Flesh of chinook or king salmon ranges in color from off-white to deep red this succulent, soft-textured, strong-flavored, fatty meat is highly prized. Coho or silver salmon meat ranges in color from pink to orange-red, is high in fat, rich in flavor, and firm in texture. Sockeye, red or blueback salmon flesh is dark red, fatty, strong-flavored, and firm-textured. Pink or humpback salmon meat is moderately fatty and of less pronounced flavor than other salmon it can be on the dry side. Chum or dog salmon meat is pale to deep orange in color, delicate in flavor, and lowest in fat of all salmon.

Best Cooking:

When absolutely fresh, raw salmon is delicious. Salmon is also excellent grilled, broiled, poached, baked, roasted, and sauteed. If grilling or broiling, you may want to choose one of the fattier varieties (eg. Atlantic or chinook), which are not as easy to overcook. The silvery skin of the salmon is very tasty when grilling whole salmon, brush the skin generously with oil to help keep it intact.

Buying Tips:

Fresh or thawed steaks and fillets should look moist and smell seawater fresh flesh should glisten. Whole fish should look alive and be well iced. Salmon is usually sold scaled with the skin left on - make sure skin looks bright, shimmery, and fresh.

Nutrition Value:

Salmon is an excellent source of protein, vitamin A, B vitamins, and Omega-3 oils.
Salmon, 1/2 fillet (5.4 oz.) (153g) (cooked, dry heat)
Calories: 280
Protein: 39g
Carbohydrate: 0.0g
Total Fat: 12.5g
Fiber: 0.0g
Excellent source* of: Potassium (967mg), Selenium (72mcg), and Niacin (15.5mg)
Good source* of: Magnesium (57mg)

When cooked (dry heat), salmon (Atlantic, wild) provides 2.218 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, derived from EPA** (0.411g), DHA*** (1.429g), ALA**** (0.378g), per 100 grams of salmon (Atlantic, wild).

When cooked (dry heat), salmon (Atlantic, farmed) provides 2.26 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, derived from EPA** (0.69g), DHA*** (1.457g), and ALA**** (0.113 grams), per 100 grams of salmon (Atlantic, farmed).

When cooked (dry heat), salmon (Chinook) provides 1.847 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, derived from EPA** (1.01g), DHA*** (0.727g), and ALA**** (0.11g), per 100 grams of salmon (Chinook).

When cooked (dry heat), salmon (chum) provides 0.848 grams of omega-3 fatty acids from EPA** (0.299g), DHA*** (0.505), and ALA**** (0.044g), per 100 grams of salmon (chum).

When cooked (dry heat), salmon (coho, wild) provides 1.114 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, derived from EPA** (0.401g), DHA*** (0.658g), and ALA**** (0.055g), per 100 grams of salmon (coho, wild).

When cooked (dry heat), salmon (Pink) provides 1.332 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, derived from EPA** (0.537 grams), DHA*** (0.751g), and ALA**** (0.044g), per 100 grams of salmon (pink).

When cooked (dry heat), salmon (sockeye) provides 1.292 grams of omega-3 fatty acids, derived from EPA** (0.53g), DHA*** (0.7g), and ALA**** (0.062g), per 100 grams of salmon (sockeye).

*Foods that are an “excellent source” of a particular nutrient provide 20% or more of the Recommended Daily Value. Foods that are a “good source” of a particular nutrient provide between 10 and 20% of the Recommended Daily Value.
**EPA - Eicosapentaenoic Acid
***DHA - Docosahexaenoic Acid
****ALA - Alpha Lipoic Acid

Substitutes for Salmon:

Char, trout.

Notes:

Salmon is anadromous, meaning that it spawns in fresh water. Some fish become landlocked in lakes, resulting in a supply of freshwater salmon, which is considered to be not as flavorful, and therefore not as prized, as saltwater salmon.

Salmon recipes


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