Tilapia

Also known as:

Bream, mouthbrooder, St. Peter's fish, Nile perch, Hawaiian sun fish, mudfish, ngege (Africa), Mozambique tilapia, blue tilapia, wami tilapia.

Description:

Waters:Fresh waters of Asia and Africa fish farms in North and South America.

Similar in shape to sunfish and variously colored (pale red, white, gray, or gray-blue) can range in size from 1 to 5 lbs.

Tilapia has white or pinkish flesh that's firm, low in fat, sweet and mild in flavor. The tender skin is edible.

Best Cooking:

Tilapia can be baked, broiled, grilled, or steamed.

Buying Tips:

In the U.S., all tilapia is farm-raised and of lesser quality than the wild variety harvested in Asia and Africa. Tilapia is often marketed as a lower-priced substitute for red snapper, although its meat is not nearly as prized.

Nutrition Value:

Tilapia, 3.5 oz (99 grams), raw
Calories: 98
Protein: 18.5g
Carbohydrate: 0.0g
Total Fat: 2.4g
Fiber: 0.0g

Substitutes for Tilapia:

Porgy, sea bass, red snapper, flounder, sole, orange roughy, and ocean perch.

Notes:

For ages, tilapia has served as an important staple food in Asia and Africa. The fish was introduced to U.S. waters in the late 1960s to minimize algae build-up (tilapia feeds on the plantlike organism).

Tilapia recipes


Print Article about Tilapia   Print Article
   
   

Yum
Free Fish & Seafood Recipes

^ Back to Top